FAQ'S

FAQ About Open MRI

An open MRI machine is shaped as a ring or doughnut. Instead of an enclosed capsule, an Open MRI uses a magnet top and bottom and is open on all four sides. MRI technology uses a powerful magnetic field and radio waves to produce images that help detect and treat disease. The images give a clear picture of the body’s muscles, organs, and other soft tissues.

  • People with Claustrophobia: An Open MRI eliminates claustrophobia for patients during an MRI exam. With the open-air design, a person can still see around the room or even watch TV.
  • Children: Open MRIs are an excellent option for children who need diagnostic testing. The open atmosphere allows a child to hold a parent’s or guardian’s hand and feel more at ease during the test.
  • Accident Injury Patients: The Open MRI technology allows every part of the body to be imaged in a weight-bearing state. People with sports or car accident injuries can be scanned in extension, flexion, rotation, and lateral bending positions.

An Open MRI is able to diagnose a wide variety of injuries and diseases such as:

  • Tumors.
  • Developmental anomalies.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Stroke.
  • Dementia.
  • Infection.
  • Chronic headaches and causes.
  • Injuries in cartilage or bone.

Metro Healthcare Partners accepts Workers Compensation, No-Fault,  Medicare, and other major medical insurance plans. The list of insurance plans we accept is continuously updated, and if you do not see your health insurance listed here, be sure to call and speak to our staff to find out if your insurance is accepted or not.

Metro Healthcare Partners accepts Workers Compensation, No-Fault,  Medicare, and other major medical insurance plans. The list of insurance plans we accept is continuously updated, and if you do not see your health insurance listed here, be sure to call and speak to our staff to find out if your insurance is accepted or not.

FAQ About Workers Comp

Following an accident at work, it is critical to report the accident to your employer as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think you’re injured, you should report workplace accidents to your employer and seek medical help from a workers’ compensation doctor. 

In New York, you are generally entitled to choose your own doctor to treat a work-related injury, as long as the doctor has been authorized by the chair of the New York Workers’ Compensation Board.

Common work-related injuries that Worker’s Compensation doctors treat include conditions such as:

  • Neck and Back Injuries.
  • Repetitive motion injuries.
  • Overuse traumas.
  • Hearing loss.
  • Psychological stress.
  • Breathing issues.
  • Musculoskeletal injuries.

Employers who do not pay for benefits typically purchase workers’ compensation insurance to cover the benefits for employees. Employees are not responsible for paying for workers’ compensation benefits.

After a workplace injury, a workers’ comp doctor will examine you and ask detailed questions about your medical history. The workers’ comp doctor will then assess any injuries you may have, how severe these injuries are, the cause of these injuries, and what kind of treatment you will need in the future.

FAQ About Knee Pain

Often, a driver or passenger is thrown forward during a car accident and will strike their knee on the dashboard. This can result in direct trauma to the knee, resulting in many different types of injuries, such as a shattered patella (knee cap.)

Your knee injury could be serious and need a doctor’s attention if,

  • You’re experiencing swelling.
  • You can’t straighten your knee or leg.
  • Your knee keeps buckling.
  • You can’t put weight on it.
  • You felt or heard a “pop” sound.
  • You experience greater than normal movement.

Below mentioned are some of the common knee injuries.

  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage is usually the result of sudden changes in direction, jumps, abrupt stops, and high-speed impact.
  • Fractures, i.e., broken bones, are often the result of a fall or a car accident.
  • A torn meniscus usually happens after a sudden twist in the leg.
  • Knee bursitis, a condition in which the bursa becomes inflamed, is often a result of constant kneeling.
  • Meniscus injury: This type of injury hurts the discs that help prevent friction between the knee bones. These discs provide cushioning and stability to the knee while walking.

If you’re experiencing knee pain consistently and it’s not going away, it’s time to seek treatment. You should also seek a diagnosis if your knee pain gets worse or limits your daily activities. Consult with our pain management specialists to diagnose and get the right treatment.

The knee is one of the most common body parts to be injured after an accident. After an auto accident, treatment for a knee injury will usually depend on the type of knee injury a person has. Our pain management doctors specialize in Orthopedics, Neurology, Chiropractic Care, and Physical Therapy at Metro Healthcare partners.

FAQ About MRI

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is an advanced and modern technological procedure that uses a large magnet and radio frequencies to produce detailed images of structures and organs in the body for professional medical staff to make accurate diagnoses. MRIs, unlike x-rays and CT scans, do NOT use radiation.

MRI scan has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone abnormalities. MRI scan can detect abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods.

Depending on the type of exam you will receive, the length of the actual procedure will typically vary between 15 minutes and 45 minutes. More involved MRIs may take longer than 45 minutes.

No, the MRI won’t cause any pain; it only requires that the patient remain still during the examination.  However, due to the length of some examinations, some patients may find it uncomfortable to stay still for the exam. The technologist will do their best to get you as comfortable as possible for the exam using MRI-safe cushions and supports.

A radiologist will review the images taken during your MRI. A radiologist is a physician trained to analyze and interpret MRIs and other radiologic examinations. The results from an MRI scan are typically interpreted within 24 hours, and the scans themselves are usually given immediately to the patient after the MRI is complete.